Grey Areas in Peer Rental Insurance Begin to Clarify

Les polices d’assurance actuelles sont-elles au pas avec les temps – en particulier, avec l’autopartage en peer-to-peer, de plus en plus populaire?

 

Liz Fong-Jones joined car sharing program Relay Rides because her car was sitting parked most of the time. An environmentally-minded M.I.T student and one-time Google employee, she saw that by renting it out, she could maximize the car’s use and potentially lessen the number of cars on the road. What she didn’t see was that she was about to become the subject of a debate about insurance and liability in the sharing economy. The man who rented Fong-Jones’s car was found at fault in an accident in which he was killed and four people in the other car were seriously injured. Insurance claims may exceed Relay Rides’ million dollar policy.

Commercial use of a personal vehicle is generally not covered by basic auto insurance and in most places, companies reserve the right to cancel or non-renew customers who rent their vehicles out. California, Washington and Oregon have all passed legislation that specifically prohibits insurance companies from canceling insurance policies and takes liability off of car owners who are car sharing. In states where no legislation has been passed, liability enters a grey area if insurance doesn’t cover car sharing and a claim exceeds the car sharing company’s insurance.

Shelby Clark, CEO and chief community officer of Relay Rides feels that an accident in a car sharing vehicle would be treated like an accident in any other vehicle; that liability would rest on who was at fault. In such a case, when damages exceed coverage, one of two things happens: there’s a settlement for the insurance limit or else they go after the person at fault’s estate, which may result in the claim going unpaid or the creation of a payment plan.

Using a personal car for commercial purposes is nothing new in the insurance world. Pizza delivery businesses and real estate agents do it all the time – the individuals or businesses simply add additional coverage to their policy. What is new is the idea of people renting out their vehicles. Insurance companies don’t prohibit you from renting your vehicle, they just don’t cover it, and they reserve the right to cancel or non-renew insurance policies if a personal vehicle is being rented out.

There is no independent data being collected on this right now, but according to Clark, insurance companies are not canceling or non-renewing policies of customer who rent their personal cars out.

“People are already using their cars for commercial purposes and they’re not canceling insurance policies, mainly because it’s for a risk that they don’t cover,” he says. “Why would you turn away paying customers over a risk that you don’t have exposure to? An insurance company has the right to cancel your insurance policy if you rent out your car, but we think it’s very unlikely that that would happen.”

[…] the insurance arrangement for peer-to-peer car sharing in the U.S. could be much better.

“I think other countries are doing an awesome job working with insurance companies and offering insurance in a much better way than in America,” says Kohli. “In Australia and Europe, are the ones who are providing insurance on behalf of the insurance company. If the car owner wants to rent their vehicle out, they have to buy insurance from the car sharing company on behalf of the insurance company, at a higher price. This way,” he continues, “the insurance companies are more liable to participate because now they’re getting all these cars shifting to their company and they’re getting the higher cost. That is a really good model.”

 

Lire la suite sur Shareable.

Francesca Musiani

Chercheuse postdoctorale, MINES ParisTech Yahoo! Fellow in Residence, Georgetown University

More Posts - Website

International Summit for Community Wireless Networks (Streaming)

Suivez en direct l’International Summit for Community Wireless Networks

4-7 October 2012 | Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya Barcelona, Spain

 

Cet évènement rassemble la majeure partie des initiatives de réseaux décentralisés mobiles à travers le monde (Commotion, Serval, Guifi, Freifunk, Funkfeur, Tidepools, etc.). Nous reviendrons dans un billet plus long sur cette conférence mais d’ores et déja, vous pouvez suivre les conférences et les discussions grace à un streaming en direct.

 

Sponsors de ce colloque:

 

François Huguet

PhD student in Communication Studies at the Codesign Lab & Media Studies at Telecom ParisTech. Supervisor: Annie Gentès / Co-supervisor: Jérôme Denis

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterDelicious

L’ « Infrastructure Turn » dans l’étude de la gouvernance de l’Internet

Au cours de sa note de lecture du nouveau livre de Brett Frischmann, « Infrastructure: The Social Value of Shared Resources », Laura DeNardis soulève des points importants sur la gouvernance de et avec l’infrastructure de l’Internet – on est en train d’assister, souligne-t-elle, à un « turn to infrastructure » dans les études de l’IG.

L’entrée de blog de Laura DeNardis sur le site de Concurring Opinions:

« Drawing from economic theory, Brett Frischmann’s excellent new book Infrastructure: The Social Value of Shared Resources (Oxford University Press 2012) has crafted an elaborate theory of infrastructure that creates an intellectual foundation for addressing some of the most critical policy issues of our time: transportation, communication, environmental protection and beyond. I wish to take the discussion about Frischmann’s book into a slightly different direction, moving away from the question of how infrastructure shapes our social and economic lives into the question of how infrastructure is increasingly co-opted as a form of governance itself.

Arrangements of technical architecture have always inherently been arrangements of power. This is certainly the case for the technologies of Internet governance designed to keep the Internet operational. This governance is not necessarily about governments but about technical design decisions, the policies of private industry and the decisions of new global institutions. By “Infrastructures of Internet governance,” I mean the technologies and processes beneath the layer of content and inherently designed to keep the Internet operational. Some of these architectures include Internet technical protocols; critical Internet resources like Internet addresses, domain names, and autonomous system numbers; the Internet’s domain name system; and network-layer systems related to access, Internet exchange points (IXPs) and Internet security intermediaries. I have published several books about the inherent politics embedded in the design of this governance infrastructure.  But here I wish to address something different. These same Internet governance infrastructures are increasingly being co-opted for political purposes completely irrelevant to their primary Internet governance function.

The most pressing policy debates in Internet governance increasingly do not involve governance of the Internet’s infrastructure but governance using the Internet’s infrastructure.  Governments and large media companies have lost control over content through laws and policies and are recognizing infrastructure as a mechanism for regaining this control.  This is certainly the case for intellectual property rights enforcement. Copyright enforcement has moved well beyond addressing specific infringing content or individuals into Internet governance-based infrastructural enforcement. The most obvious examples include the graduated response methods that terminate the Internet access of individuals that repeatedly violate copyright laws and the domain name seizures that use the Internet’s domain name system (DNS) to redirect queries away from an entire web site rather than just the infringing content. These techniques are ultimately carried out by Internet registries, Internet registrars, or even by non-authoritative DNS operators such as Internet service providers. Domain name seizures in the United States often originate with the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency. DNS-based enforcement was also at the heart of controversies and Internet boycotts over the legislative efforts to pass the Protect IP Act (PIPA) and the Stop Online Privacy Act (SOPA).

An even more pronounced connection between infrastructure and governance occurs in so-called “kill-switch” interventions in which governments, via private industry, enact outages of basic telecommunications and Internet infrastructures, whether via protocols, application blocking, or terminating entire cell phone or Internet access services. From Egypt to the Bay Area Rapid Transit service blockages, the collateral damage of these outages to freedom of expression and public safety is of great concern. The role of private industry in enacting governance via infrastructure was also obviously visible during the WikiLeaks CableGate saga during which financial services firms like PayPal, Visa and MasterCard opted to block the financial flow of money to WikiLeaks and Amazon and EveryDNS blocked web hosting and domain name resolution services, respectively.

This turn to governance via infrastructures of Internet governance raises several themes for this online symposium. The first theme relates to the privatization of governance whereby industry is voluntarily or obligatorily playing a heightened role in regulating content and governing expression as well as responding to restrictions on expression. Concerns here involve not only the issue of legitimacy and public accountability but also the possibly undue economic burden placed on private information intermediaries to carry out this governance. The question about private ordering is not just a question of Internet freedom but of economic freedom for the companies providing basic Internet infrastructures. The second theme relates to the future of free expression. Legal lenses into freedom of expression often miss the infrastructure-based governance sinews that already permeate the Internet’s underlying technical architecture. The third important theme involves the question of what this technique of governance via infrastructure will mean for the technical infrastructure itself.  As an engineer as well as a social scientist, my concern is for the effects of these practices on Internet stability and security, particularly the co-opting of the Internet’s domain name system for content mediation functions for which the DNS was never intended. The stability of the Internet’s infrastructure is not a given but something that must be protected from the unintended consequences of these new governance approaches. »

 

Francesca Musiani

Chercheuse postdoctorale, MINES ParisTech Yahoo! Fellow in Residence, Georgetown University

More Posts - Website

Diaspora en open source

Le réseau social en P2P, Diaspora, dont nous avons déjà parlé, sous pression après les importants financements qu’il avait réussi à lever, passe en open source, ce que d’aucuns considèrent comme rendant tangible son échec présent: son incapacité à générer un effet de réseau indispensable à son succès auprès du grand public.

La conclusion laisse encore une porte ouverte pour l’avenir de Diaspora: « I remain cautiously optimistic that the open source community can create something great out of the code the founders released into the wild. Perhaps the existing code will be forked and become the basis for a new project that lacks Diaspora’s baggage. But no matter the outcome, its troubled development will stand as a crowdfunding cautionary tale about the dangers of promising much more than you can deliver. »

Traduction française ici, par la Revue Réseaux TIC

Des réseaux sociaux plus protecteurs de la vie privée…

Du site de la CNIL:

Les réseaux sociaux peuvent être de formidables outils de communication à disposition des internautes. Toutefois, ils présentent également des risques d’atteinte à la vie privée si les données publiées ne sont pas maîtrisées ou si leurs éditeurs ne mettent pas en œuvre toutes les mesures nécessaires pour protéger les données de leurs membres.   Plusieurs réseaux sociaux ont mis en place des dispositifs plus protecteurs de la vie privée de leurs membres. La CNIL invite l’ensemble des acteurs à s’inspirer de ces bonnes pratiques et propose de les accompagner vers une meilleure conformité.

Le fonctionnement de la majorité des réseaux sociaux repose sur la mise à disposition d’un service gratuit en contrepartie d’une collecte d’informations pour une utilisation commerciale (analyse des profils et de la navigation sur internet pour délivrer de la publicité ciblée, transmissions de données à des tiers, …). Or, il est difficile de déterminer le devenir de ces informations une fois qu’elles sont sur le réseau.

C’est pourquoi le G29 (groupe des CNIL européennes) a précisé les règles applicables aux réseaux sociaux dans un avis du 12 juin 2009. Les CNIL européennes leur demandent notamment de :

  • définir des paramètres par défaut limitant la diffusion des données des internautes
  • mettre en place des mesures pour protéger les mineurs
  • supprimer les comptes qui sont restés inactifs pendant une longue période
  • permettre aux personnes, même si elles ne sont pas membres des réseaux sociaux, de bénéficier d’un droit de suppression des données qui les concernent
  • proposer aux internautes d’utiliser un pseudonyme, plutôt que leur identité réelle
  • mettre en place un outil accessible aux membres et aux non membres, sur la page d’accueil des réseaux sociaux, permettant de déposer des plaintes relatives à la vie privée.

L’ensemble de ces règles n’est malheureusement pas toujours respecté. Aussi, la CNIL tient à souligner la démarche entreprise par certains réseaux sociaux tel que le réseau social Famicity qui s’est engagé à suivre l’ensemble des règles protectrices de la vie privée émises par le G29. La CNIL a accompagné cette mise en conformité de Famicity.

L’initiative du réseau social Diaspora peut également être soulignée. Il s’agit d’un réseau social libre où le contrôle des données personnelles par les utilisateurs est a priori garanti par plusieurs techniques.

D’autres sites proposent également des mesures protectrices, en particulier des mineurs, il s’agit par exemple de Mondokiddo, de le Mini réseau, de l’Univers de Wilby ou de Yoocasa.

La CNIL participe ainsi à la mise en conformité des gestionnaires de réseaux sociaux, et invite à la diffusion de ces bonnes pratiques, à destination notamment des mineurs..

Francesca Musiani

Chercheuse postdoctorale, MINES ParisTech Yahoo! Fellow in Residence, Georgetown University

More Posts - Website

Les alternatives aux réseaux sociaux : l’architecture distribuée et le design de média

Critique du livre Les Réseaux sociaux – Culture politique et ingénierie des réseaux sociaux et de l’article Les alternatives aux réseaux sociaux : l’architecture distribuée et le design de média – Annie Gentès, François Huguet – Collection du Nouveau Monde industriel sous la direction de Bernard Stiegler (éditions Fyp, Paris, 2012) sur Nonfiction.fr

 

Des réseaux pas si sociaux, un ouvrage collectif qui remet en question nombre d’idées reçues sur notre façon de vivre le « Web social » par Maxime Vaudano, étudiant à l’école supérieure de journalisme de Lille. Retrouvez la critique ici.

Les alternatives aux réseaux sociaux – l’architecture distribuée et le design de média-Gentes, HuguetCulture politique et ingénierie des réseaux sociaux (direction Bernard STIEGLER) Annie GENTES & François HUGUET

 

 

 

François Huguet

PhD student in Communication Studies at the Codesign Lab & Media Studies at Telecom ParisTech. Supervisor: Annie Gentès / Co-supervisor: Jérôme Denis

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterDelicious

Open Garden – Crowdsourcing mobile Wifi

Le vainqueur du concours TechCrunch Disrupt de la start-up la plus innovante qui s’est tenu à New York du19 au 23 mai dernier est un projet intitulé Open Garden Mesh. Il s’agit d’un logiciel de partage de connexion internet entre différents appareils ou en d’autres termes l’établissement d’un réseau ad-hoc où les appareils « autorisés » bénéficient d’un connexion optimale dans un « filet » de connectivité.

Dans un article du Figaro du 13 juin 2012, Sophie Amsili ajoute que:

« Open Garden a développé sa propre technologie pour permettre aux appareils dotés de l’application de se connecter automatiquement entre eux lorsqu’ils se trouvent à proximité. Chacun se transforme alors en routeur au sein d’un réseau «mesh» (un «filet» sans point d’accès central). «Si un appareil de ce réseau a accès à Internet, un autre appareil peut alors en bénéficier», a expliqué Michal Benoliel, cofondateur et PDG d’Open Garden et ancien de Skype lors de la conférence TechCrunch Disrupt à San Francisco où la start-up a été primée.

Un système de crédits

Plus précisément, les appareils interconnectés vont choisir la connexion de meilleure qualité dans le réseau, qu’elle soit Wi-Fi, 3G et 4G. Open Garden pourrait-il alors ouvrir la voie aux «passagers clandestins», ces internautes qui utiliseraient la connexion des autres sans en payer aucune? Conscient de ce problème, la start-up indique travailler sur plusieurs solutions, notamment un système de crédits: quand on ouvre son accès à Internet, on collecte des crédits qu’on peut ensuite utiliser pour se connecter à d’autres appareils. «Vous recevez ce que vous donnez», résume Michal Benoliel.

Disponible sur iPhone, Android, Windows et Mac, l’application est gratuite et est destinée à le rester, a précisé le PDG. Seules certaines fonctionnalités, comme un réseau privé (VPN) et un débit plus élevé, pourraient être payantes.

Open Garden n’est pas la première start-up à vouloir rendre gratuits ou plus libres certains services propres aux nouvelles technologies de l’information. Prédécesseur d’Open Garden, la start-up espagnole Fon, créée en 2006, ambitionne elle aussi de créer une communauté mondiale partageant son réseau wi-fi. Les applications mobiles Viber et Skype permettent quant à elles de passer des appels et des d’envoyer des SMS gratuitement dans le monde entier. »

L’illustration de la technologie Open Garden en vidéo:

 

Nous reviendrons prochainement sur ce projet qui est au cœur des enjeux de nos recherches sur les architectures distribuées mobiles. Notons néanmoins l’actualité de ce type d’architectures mobiles qui après le « buzz » médiatique de Commotion et de Serval révèle les applications toutes récentes et à destination du grand public des réseaux MESH.

 

Sources:

 

 

François Huguet

PhD student in Communication Studies at the Codesign Lab & Media Studies at Telecom ParisTech. Supervisor: Annie Gentès / Co-supervisor: Jérôme Denis

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterDelicious

Bit Torrent en 24 heures

Bit Torrent vient de publier une vidéo sur laquelle sont représentées les connexions au protocole de peer to peer durant 24 heures. Il s’agit en fait d’une carte du monde sur laquelle apparaissent toutes les connexions cumulées de ses clients (BitTorrent ou µTorrent) en une journée, résumées en quelques minutes.

Selon Eric Le Bourlout de 01.net

(…) un peu plus de 60 millions d’enregistrements sur le réseau, chaque point allumé correspondant à un utilisateur. A noter que cette visualisation ne montre pas l’intégralité des connexions à BitTorrent, puisqu’il existe bien d’autres logiciels non officiels pour s’y connecter. Impressionnant !

François Huguet

PhD student in Communication Studies at the Codesign Lab & Media Studies at Telecom ParisTech. Supervisor: Annie Gentès / Co-supervisor: Jérôme Denis

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterDelicious

Facebook & Pipe – nouvelle génération du peer to peer?

« Couverture » ou « application-portail d’entrée »? Facebook deviendrait il un support nouvelle génération du Peer to peer?

Après une entrée en bourse dont beaucoup de personnes parlent encore aujourd’hui, le réseau social #1 se voit devenir  une forme de support d’une application d’échanges de fichier « décentralisée » intitulée Pipe (en référence aux tuyaux du jeu vidéo Mario Bros, où le plombier italien déambulait en 2D au sein de tuyaux verts). « Décentralisée » semble un terme un peu exagéré du fait que les connexions entre utilisateurs de pipe se font via Facebook, donc via le répertoire de ce réseau social qui n’est pas du tout décentralisé… Nous attendons donc plus de précisions à propos du fonctionnement et de l’architecture de cette application.

Ce service est toute récent (encore en test- version béta fermée) mais on peut en avoir un léger aperçu au travers de cette vidéo:

et celle-ci:

Voir également cet article de softonic.

Peu d’information sdonc si ce n’est celles qui figurent sur son site web et qui nous semblent fort intéressantes:

What is Pipe?

The Pipe application provides a really simple and intuitive UI, literally a pipe coming out of the computer screen into which the user just drags and drops a file. On the other side, the file emerges out of the friend’s Pipe, magically. In this way, Pipe creates a direct, real-time connection between two devices with no intermediary server. Pipe starts as an application on Facebook, and is then migrating to mobile devices and tablets (verrons nous donc apparaitre une version « mobile » qui permettrait de faire de l’échange de fichiers de façon directe?).

 

Why Pipe?

As surprising as it sounds, there’s currently no easy and effective way to transfer a file to a friend via Facebook. Pipe has taken a common feature of communication – attaching a file – and turned it into something simple and fun to use. What could be easier than dropping a file into the Pipe and have it appear at the other end, via the Pipe? Privacy is guaranteed as it’s a direct connection from one device to the other, between friends.

 

Key Facts

  • Pipe is an application on the Facebook platform
  • Send and receive files with any online friend
  • Live connection to send files back & forth
  • Support for any file format, up to 1GB*
  • Only the sender needs to be on Pipe
  • Invite a friend to Pipe with a simple file transfer
  • Direct connection with no intermediary server

* The limit is based on the available memory in your browser cache.

François Huguet

PhD student in Communication Studies at the Codesign Lab & Media Studies at Telecom ParisTech. Supervisor: Annie Gentès / Co-supervisor: Jérôme Denis

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterDelicious

Serval, (enfin!) une « architecture distribuée mobile »

Un projet de service-application mobile complètement distribué voit le jour (enfin!).

Nous reviendrons très prochainement et plus en détail sur ce type de services mais en attendant, voici une petite revue de presse (en français) à propos de Serval projet initié par le chercheur australien Paul Gardner-Stephen et des étudiants de l’INSA Lyon.

 

 

 

 

SITE OFFICIEL: http://www.servalproject.org

 

François Huguet

PhD student in Communication Studies at the Codesign Lab & Media Studies at Telecom ParisTech. Supervisor: Annie Gentès / Co-supervisor: Jérôme Denis

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterDelicious

Vidéos de la conférence Unlike Us 2 – 8 et 10 mars 2012, Amsterdam, TrouwAmsterdam

 

L’institute of Network Cultures organisait les 8 et 10 mars 2012, un colloque international sur  les alternatives aux réseaux sociaux.

La « chaine TV » des différentes interventions du colloque est à retrouver sur la chaine d’Unlike Us:

 

http://vimeo.com/album/1774005

 



Unlike Us – Understanding Social Media Monopolies and their Alternatives from network cultures on Vimeo.

François Huguet

PhD student in Communication Studies at the Codesign Lab & Media Studies at Telecom ParisTech. Supervisor: Annie Gentès / Co-supervisor: Jérôme Denis

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterDelicious