Production entre pairs, argent et valeur

Le numéro 4 du Journal of Peer Production, sur le thème de l’argent et de la valeur, vient d’être publié. Il est coordonné par Nathaniel Tkacz, Nicolas Mendoza et moi même, et inclut deux contributions par des membres du projet ADAM. Alexandre Mallard, Cécile Méadel et moi explorons le rôle performatif de la connaissance experte dans la construction d’une « confiance distribuée » pour le système de monnaie électronique décentralisé Bitcoin, tandis que Primavera De Filippi, en collaboration avec Miguel Said Vieira de l’université de São Paulo, propose un système de licences plus adaptée à l’économie des communs.

La totalité du numéro est librement disponible ici. Quelques extraits de l’introduction:

« Peer production has often been described as a ‘third mode of production’, irreducible to State or market imperatives. The creation and organisation of peer projects allegedly take place without ‘managerial commands’ or ‘price signals’, without recourse to bureaucratic apparatuses or the logic of competitive markets. Instead, and mimicking the technical architectures upon which many peer projects are based, production is described as non-hierarchical and decentralised. Group dynamics are also commonly described as ‘flat’ and this is captured, of course, in the very notion of the ‘peer’. When tested against the realities of actual projects, however, such early conceptions of peer production are, at best, in need of further elaboration and qualification. At worst, they were always off the mark. Hierarchies persist in peer production, as does competition and market-like arrangements. But perhaps it is the qualities of these new hierarchies and competitive forms that is novel. After all, liberal democracies, dictatorships, corporations, local sports clubs, and families all have their hierarchies but none is reducible to the others.

In the context of earlier understandings of peer production, the question of value and even more of currency has been rather marginal. This issue of the Journal of Peer Production (JoPP) demonstrates that theories and practices of value and currency are moving into the foreground. There has been a veritable explosion of experiments with currency and also a continuing metrics creep in many peer projects and beyond. More fundamentally, though, the question of value and how it circulates through a collective body is central to any mature theory of social organisation. In sociological and economic thought, the historical distinction between ‘values’ and ‘value’ split the non- or at least less-easily-calculable with the seemingly cold and objective world of calculation and universal commensurability. This ‘old settlement’, which never really held, nevertheless helped demarcate the economic from the social. But the intensification and extension of computational processes, manifested most clearly in the rise of big data, has lead to a proliferation of bottom-up procedures to formalise (social) values, rendering them easily calculable and lending order to the decentralised world of peers, but without necessarily replicating capitalistic calculations of value. […]

In this issue we seek to advance the exploration and understanding of how the themes of value and currency intersect peer production. This objective presented a double challenge for the contributors and for us as editors. Indeed, the scholarly articles included in this issue have attempted to provide analytical and theoretically grounded investigations of a world that is, on the one hand, often developing more quickly than the academic publication process can account for in a timely way, and on the other hand, mostly shaped by expert-practitioners. At the same time, these contributions seek to engage not only with scholars of related issues within the academic community, but also with practitioners themselves — who, on their end, have demonstrated a strong interest in this dialogue, as the invited comments section shows. »

Francesca Musiani

Chercheuse postdoctorale, MINES ParisTech Yahoo! Fellow in Residence, Georgetown University

More Posts - Website

Call for Papers, Final Symposium of the ADAM project

Call for Papers, Final Symposium of the ADAM project

October 2-3, 2014, MINES ParisTech (Paris, France)

 cropped-logo-blog-adam2.jpg

« Reclaiming the Internet » with distributed architectures:

rights, technologies, practices, innovation

The research program ADAM (Distributed Architectures and Multimedia Applications, adam.hypotheses.org) (1) studies the technical, political, social, socio-cultural and legal implications of distributed network architectures. This term indicates a type of network bearing several features: a network made of multiple computing units, capable to achieve its objective by sharing resources and tasks, able to tolerate the failure of individual nodes and thus not subjected to single points of failure, and able to scale flexibly. Beyond this simplified operational definition, the choice, by developers and engineers of Internet-based services, to develop these architectures instead of today’s widespread centralized models, has several implications for the daily use of online services and for the rights of Internet users.

The final symposium of the ADAM project, open to disciplines as varied as science and technology studies, information and communication sciences, economics, law and network engineering, aims at investigating these implications in terms of a central issue. With the increasingly evident centralization of the Internet and the surveillance excesses it appears to allow, what are the place and the role of the (re-) decentralisation of networks’ technical architectures – at a time when infringements upon privacy and pervasive surveillance practices are often embedded in these architectures? Are distribution and decentralization of network architectures the ways, as Philippe Aigrain suggests (2), to “reclaim” Internet services – instruments of ‘technical governance’ able to reconnect with the original organisation of cyberspace?

Papers presented at the symposium may focus on one or more of the following four axes, although we welcome proposals that do not fully subscribe to them.

  • Back to the origins”? Past and present of distributed architectures. The initial Internet model called for a decentralised and symmetrical organisation – in terms of bandwidth usage, but also of contacts, user relations and machine-to-machine communication. In the 1990s, the commercial explosion of the Internet brings about important changes, exposing the shortcomings – for the network’s usability and its very functioning – of a model presupposing the active cooperation of all network members. Today, in a world of Internet services where fluxes and data converge towards a few giants, experimentations with distributed architectures are seen as a “return to the origins”. But is it really about the dominance of an organizational principle at different times in history – or is there a co-existence of different levels of resource centralisation, hierarchy of powers, and cooperation among Internet users over time? Are we indeed witnessing a “war of the worlds” of which the recent tensions around surveillance are the most recent illustration?
  • (Re-) decentralisation, a sustainable alternative for the Internet ‘ecology’? The technical features of distributed architectures (direct connections, resistance to failure) and their ability to support the emergence of organisational, social and legal principles (privacy, security, recognition of rights) offer new paths of exploration and preservation of the Internet’s balance. At the same time, the road towards decentralisation is far from linear. The users behind the P2P nodes can assemble in collectives that are very varied in nature, complexity and underlying motivations. This variety may be dependent upon modes of aggregation, visibility devices, types of communication tools and envisaged business models (as well as the difficulty of identifying sustainable ones). Having programmed the infrastructures with the idea that the most part of users’ online activities consist in downloading data and information from clusters of servers, network access providers raise economic objections to P2P models. Finally, developers-turned-entrepreneurs themselves often need to revisit the choice of decentralisation, because of unexpected user practices, the impossibility of making distributed technology “easy” for the public, or the seductive simplicity of centralized infrastructures and economic models.
  • Decentralisation and distribution of skills, rights, control. How does distributed architecture redefine user skills, rights, capacities to control? How can law support user practices and their diversity, instead of countering them? The decentralisation of Internet services raises several issues at the crossroads of law and technology. What are the differences if compared to centralized architectures, non-modifiable by users, where data are stored on clusters of servers exclusively controlled by service providers? From the viewpoint of user empowerment, what are the consequences of introducing encryption, file fragmentation, sharing of disk space in the technical architecture? While “first-generation” P2P networks have affected copyright first and foremost, decentralised Internet-based service prompt us to investigate issues like the redefinition of notions such as creator and distributor, the responsibility of technical intermediaries, the ‘embeddedness’ of law into technical devices.
  • What are the communicational models at stake in decentralised infrastructures and architectures? Distributed Internet services have transformed and transform today the ways in which actors make sense of their communicational capacities and their responsibilities in information sharing. User empowerment, prompted by several P2P services – increasingly mobile, self-configurable and flexible – open innovative perspectives for infrastructures of communication, their functions and their mediation capacities among actors. In what ways does this evolution transform data and communication channels? What are the representations of the values subtending these architectures and the relations among their participants, vis-à-vis other Internet services, but also within the spheres of conception, discussion and circulation of these objects? What are the new forms of contribution and what do they enable in terms of pedagogical practices and shared literacies? Finally, in which ways do distributed infrastructures relate to the notion of ‘informational common good’?

We invite paper proposals in French and/or English, in the form of a 500 to 800 word abstract sent to the address francesca.musiani@mines-paristech.fr. Key dates:

  • Deadline for the sending of abstracts: May 15, 2014 (Please note that the submission deadline for abstracts has been extended to June 5, 2014)
  • Notifications of acceptance sent by the Program Committee: June 6, 2014
  • Deadline for full papers: September 15, 2014
  • ADAM final symposium: October 2-3, 2014

We envisage a collective publication originating from the conference and are looking into different possibilities (edited book or special issue of a journal).

ADAM Project Team and Program Committee of the Symposium

Maya Bacache, Département SES, Télécom ParisTech

Danièle Bourcier, CERSA, CNRS

Primavera De Filippi, CERSA, CNRS

Isabelle Demeure, INFRES, Télécom ParisTech

Mélanie Dulong de Rosnay, ISCC, CNRS

Annie Gentès, CoDesign Lab, Télécom ParisTech

François Huguet, CoDesign Lab, Télécom ParisTech

Alexandre Mallard, CSI, MINES ParisTech

Cécile Méadel, CSI, MINES ParisTech

Francesca Musiani, CSI, MINES ParisTech

(1)  Funded by the French National Agency for Research (ANR), CONTINT (Contents and Interactions) Programme

(2)  Aigrain, P. (2010). “Declouding Freedom: Reclaiming Servers, Services and Data.” In 2020 FLOSS Roadmap (2010 Version/3rd Edition), https://flossroadmap.co-ment.com/text/NUFVxf6wwK2/view/

Francesca Musiani

Chercheuse postdoctorale, MINES ParisTech Yahoo! Fellow in Residence, Georgetown University

More Posts - Website

Appel à communications, Colloque final ADAM

Appel à communications pour le colloque final du projet ADAM

2-3 octobre 2014, MINES ParisTech

 Logo Principal ADAM

Architectures distribuées et réappropriations de l’Internet :

droits, techniques, usages, innovation

Le programme de recherche ADAM – Architecture distribuée et applications multimédias (adam.hypotheses.org) (1) étudie les implications techniques, politiques, sociales, socio-culturelles et légales des architectures de réseau distribuées. Ce terme désigne un type de réseau doté d’un certain nombre de caractéristiques : un réseau composé de multiples unités de calcul, capable de réaliser son objectif en partageant ressources et tâches, tolérant la défaillance de nœuds individuels et donc sans point unique d’échec, capable de passer à l’échelle de manière souple. Au delà de cette définition technique simplifiée, le choix, de la part d’ingénieurs et concepteurs des services Internet, de développer ces architectures par rapport aux modèles centralisés très répandus aujourd’hui, a de nombreuses implications pour l’utilisation quotidienne des services en ligne, ainsi que pour les droits des internautes.

Le colloque final du programme ADAM, ouvert à des disciplines variées telles que les Science and technology studies, les sciences de l’information et de la communication, l’économie, le droit et l’ingénierie des réseaux, s’attache à explorer ces enjeux à l’aune d’une question centrale. Avec la centralisation de plus en plus affichée d’internet et les excès de surveillance qu’elle autorise, quelle place et quel rôle joue la (re-) décentralisation des architectures techniques des réseaux, en un moment historique où les atteintes à la vie privée et les pratiques de surveillance sont très souvent inscrites (embedded) dans l’architecture technique ? Les architectures de réseau distribuées et décentralisées sont-elles, comme le suggère Philippe Aigrain (2), des occasions de réappropriation des services Internet – des outils techniques et de gouvernance susceptibles de renouer avec l’organisation originelle du cyberespace ?

Les communications pourront s’articuler autour d’un ou plusieurs des quatre axes de réflexion suivants, mais ne doivent pas forcément s’y conformer.

  • Un « retour aux origines » ? Passé et présent des architectures distribuées. Le modèle initial de l’Internet suppose une organisation décentralisée et symétrique – non seulement en termes de consommation de bande passante, mais aussi en termes de contact, relation et communication entre machines. Au milieu des années 1990, l’explosion commerciale de l’Internet en change radicalement la forme, révélant bientôt les limites – du point de vue du fonctionnement du réseau et de son « usabilité » pour les internautes – d’un modèle qui présuppose une coopération active de tous les membres du réseau. Aujourd’hui, dans un monde de services Internet où les flux et les données convergent vers quelques géants, les expérimentations en matière d’architecture distribuée sont vues comme un retour aux origines. Serait-ce pertinent de considérer ces dynamiques comme co-existence générique de différents niveaux de centralisation des ressources, de hiérarchisation des pouvoirs, et de coopération des internautes plutôt que comme domination d’un principe organisationnel à différents moments de l’histoire ? A-t-on affaire à une « guerre des mondes », dont les tensions autour de la surveillance ne sont que l’illustration la plus récente ?
  • La (re-)décentralisation, une alternative durable pour l’écologie Internet ? Les caractéristiques techniques des architectures distribuées (efficacité, mise en relation directe, tolérance aux pannes) et leur capacité à promouvoir l’émergence de principes organisationnels, sociaux et légaux (sécurité, privacy, reconnaissance de droits) offrent des nouvelles pistes d’exploration et de maintien des équilibres au sein de l’écologie Internet. En même temps, la route vers la re-décentralisation est loin d’être linéaire. Selon les modalités d’agrégation, les dispositifs de mise en visibilité, les outils de communication fournis, et la nature des modèles d’affaire concernés (voir la difficulté à en envisager de durables), les usagers qui constituent les nœuds des systèmes P2P peuvent produire des collectifs très différents dans leur nature, leur extension et leur motivation à s’investir dans les systèmes distribués. Plusieurs fournisseurs d’accès au réseau, ayant programmé leurs systèmes sur l’idée que les usagers passent le plus clair de leur temps en ligne à télécharger données et informations depuis des serveurs centraux, soulèvent des objections de nature économique aux modèles P2P. Enfin, les développeurs eux-mêmes doivent parfois, lors du passage à l’entrepreneuriat, revoir leur choix de décentralisation, face à des appropriations inattendues par les utilisateurs, l’impossibilité de rendre aisée la technologie distribuée au grand public, ou encore la simplicité, séductrice pour le « contrôleur », des modèles d’affaires et des infrastructures centralisé(e)s.
  • Décentralisation et nouvelles répartitions de compétences, autorisations, droits. Comment l’architecture distribuée redéfinit-elle les compétences, la capacité de contrôle, les droits des utilisateurs ? Comment le droit peut-il accompagner les pratiques et leur diversité, au lieu de les contrer ? La décentralisation des services Internet pose de nombreuses questions au croisement entre droit et technique. Quelles sont les différences par rapport aux architectures centralisées que les utilisateurs ne peuvent pas modifier, et dans lesquelles les données sont stockées sur des serveurs centraux détenus par les fournisseurs de services? Quelles sont les implications des emplacements physiques des contenus, des types spécifiques de licences, des procédures de collecte et gestion de données ? En quoi l’introduction dans l’architecture technique d’éléments tels que l’encryptage, la fragmentation des fichiers, la mise à disposition d’espace disque, a-t-elle des conséquences pour l’encapacitation (empowerment) et la montée en compétence des utilisateurs ? Si c’est surtout le droit d’auteur qui a d’abord été chamboulé par les réseaux P2P « première génération », les services Internet décentralisés nous amènent à concentrer notre attention sur des questions telles que la redéfinition des notions de créateur et de distributeur, ou la responsabilité des intermédiaires techniques, l’inscription de l’exécution du droit dans les dispositifs techniques.
  • Quels sont les modèles communicationnels en jeu dans ces nouvelles infrastructures et architectures ? Les services internet  distribués ont transformé et transforment toujours aujourd’hui la façon dont les acteurs se représentent leurs capacités communicationnelles et leurs responsabilités dans le partage de l’information. L’encapacitation des utilisateurs ouverte par nombre de ces services peer-to-peer qui tendent de plus en plus à devenir mobiles, auto-configurables et flexibles dans leurs utilisations et dans les fonctions qu’ils offrent ouvre des perspectives innovantes sur les fonctionnalités des infrastructures de communication et leurs capacités de médiation entre des acteurs. De quelle manière cette évolution transforme-t-elle les données et les canaux d’information ? Comment les valeurs de ces architectures et les relations entre leurs participants sont-elles représentées face aux autres services internet mais également à l’intérieur des sphères où l’on conçoit, discute et fait circuler ces objets ? Quelles sont les nouvelles formes de contribution, Qu’engagent-elles des pratiques pédagogiques et de litératies partagées ? Enfin, de quelles manières ces infrastructures distribuées interrogent-elles la notion de bien commun informationnel ?

Nous sollicitons des propositions de communication en français et en anglais, sous la forme d’un résumé de 500-800 mots, à l’adresse francesca.musiani@mines-paristech.fr. La date limite pour l’envoi des propositions est le 5 juin 2014 et le comité de programme enverra les notifications d’acceptation au plus tard le fin juin 2014. Les articles complets devront nous parvenir au plus tard le 15 septembre 2014 (le colloque ayant lieu à Paris, le 2 et 3 octobre 2014). Des possibilités de publication collective (ouvrage ou numéro spécial d’une revue) seront envisagées par la suite.

Equipe du projet ADAM et comité de programme

Maya Bacache, Département SES, Télécom ParisTech

Danièle Bourcier, CERSA, CNRS

Primavera De Filippi, CERSA, CNRS

Isabelle Demeure, INFRES, Télécom ParisTech

Mélanie Dulong de Rosnay, ISCC, CNRS

Annie Gentès, CoDesign Lab, Télécom ParisTech

François Huguet, CoDesign Lab, Télécom ParisTech

Alexandre Mallard, CSI, MINES ParisTech

Cécile Méadel, CSI, MINES ParisTech

Francesca Musiani, CSI, MINES ParisTech

(1)  Financé par l’ANR (Programme CONTINT – Contenus et Interactions)

(2)  Aigrain, P. (2010). “Declouding Freedom: Reclaiming Servers, Services and Data.” In 2020 FLOSS Roadmap (2010 Version/3rd Edition), https://flossroadmap.co-ment.com/text/NUFVxf6wwK2/view/

Francesca Musiani

Chercheuse postdoctorale, MINES ParisTech Yahoo! Fellow in Residence, Georgetown University

More Posts - Website

Taïwan manifeste en peer-to-peer : les réseaux MESH comme infrastructures de contestation, d’organisation et de débat

photo extraite de « Unblockable? Unstoppable? FireChat messaging app unites China and Taiwan in free speech… and it’s not pretty » – 31 mars 2014 – www.techinasia.com [http://www.techinasia.com/unblockable-unstoppable-firechat-messaging-app-unites-china-and-taiwan-in-free-speech-and-its-not-pretty/]

Le dimanche 30 mars 2014, des milliers de personnes manifestaient dans les rues Taïwanaises contre le président Ma Ying-jeou et un projet d’accord commercial avec la Chine[1]. Dès le lendemain, un article de Tech in Asia décrivait certains des comportements communicationnels des manifestants et l’impact d’une technologie tout à fait singulière qui équipe désormais les contestataires de la révolution des Tournesols, une application pour iPhone nommée FireChat. Cette dernière s’empare pour la première fois de la fonction Multipeer Connectivity Framework d’iOS7[2] (« partage de connexion » en français) et elle semble en mesure de bousculer à la fois les habitudes communicatives des manifestants, leurs manières de « chorégraphier » les mouvements sociaux[3] et leurs interactions avec les internautes chinois.

Retour sur un cas d’usage tout à fait inédit et plein d’enseignements sur les architectures distribuées mobiles mais également sur les infrastructures de communication participatives et le rôle des médias sociaux lors de contestations politiques citoyennes.

Après l’occupation du Parlement taïwanais par des étudiants débutée il y a plus de deux semaines, le mouvement des tournesols[4] a pris ce dimanche une ampleur bien plus importante. Plusieurs centaines de milliers de citoyens opposés à un traité de libre-échange entre Taïwan et la Chine ont défilé dans les rues de Taipei (87 000 selon les estimations de la police Taïwanaise, 500 000 selon les médias[5]).

Premier partenaire commercial de Taïwan, la République populaire de Chine cherche à maintenir à tout prix des relations politico-économiques avec l’île de la République de Chine afin d’ouvrir son gigantesque marché contre une ouverture de celui de Taïwan pour ses propres entreprises. Pour Stéphane Corcuff, Maître de conférences en Science Politique et directeur de l’antenne de Taipei du Centre d’Études Français sur la Chine contemporaine (UMR- Ministère des Affaires Etrangères / CNRS – Institut Français de Recherche à l’Etranger), ces manifestations révèlent surtout des craintes fortes de la population Taïwanaise. Interrogé par Le Monde le vendredi 28 mars 2014[6], il déclarait:

« Les étudiants se mobilisent contre des procédés de négociation qu’ils considèrent comme opaques et porteurs de risques pour la société taïwanaise. Derrière ce malaise, il y a la triple question de leur liberté, de leur souveraineté et de leur identité face à l’irrédentisme chinois. […]

Mais un nombre croissant de gens craignent que la Chine gagne une force d’influence considérable grâce à cet accord économique — jusqu’à dicter sa politique au président taïwanais Ma Ying-jeou, pensent-ils. On en arrive aujourd’hui à ce soupçon que Ma veuille « vendre Taïwan à la Chine », qu’on a vu s’exprimer dans différents slogans »

13509411553_5946ff052c_b-720x450
photo extraite de « Unblockable? Unstoppable? FireChat messaging app unites China and Taiwan in free speech… and it’s not pretty » – 31 mars 2014 – www.techinasia.com [op.cit]

De San Francisco à Taïwan…

Bien loin de l’ile de Formose, de ces slogans et de ces mouvements contestataires socioéconomiques et culturels, tout près de « la glorieuse constellation des figures de la Silicon Valley »[7] ; les ingénieurs de chez Open Garden qui regroupent deux français (Micha Benoliel, fondateur d’Open Garden et Christophe Daligault, responsable communication) doivent se frotter les mains et se gratter les yeux tellement leur « petite » appli FireChat, dérivée de leur produit phare, Open Garden, un logiciel gratuit qui permet de partager sa connexion internet de manière extrêmement simple, est en train de faire parler d’elle et d’attirer l’attention des médias internationaux (concernant le milieu techno-scientifique, le 28 mars 2014, la MIT Technology Review se penchait sur le « cas » FireChat et ne tarissait pas d’éloges à son encontre)…

Lancée depuis San Francisco le 20 mars 2014, FireChat est en passe de devenir l’une des applications téléchargeable gratuitement phares de l’AppStore, catégorie arme de discussion massive Très bien classée dans les rangs des services de messagerie instantanée les plus téléchargées dans le monde (parfois numéro 1, et la plupart du temps dans le top 5) l’appli a été pensée, selon Christophe Daligault, comme une « proof of concept » (appli prototype) de services mobiles pour des situations ou des utilisateurs vont en boite de nuit, assistent à des évènements sportifs ou des festivals, lieux où les réseaux GSM sont bien souvent saturés. « On se rend compte aujourd’hui que des personnes ont pris en main cette technologie et en ont fait d’autres choses ». Eux qui avaient pensé ce « prototype d’appli » pour les festivaliers du Coachella (festival de musique en Californie qui aura lieu du 11 au 13 avril 2014), ils se sont retrouvés ce week end avec un début de killer application très utilisée par des manifestants ayant l’habitude de manipuler ce genre de dispositifs de communication (taux de pénétration d’internet à Taïwan en 2012: 75.4 %[8])…

L’article de Tech in Asia intitulé « Unblockable? Unstoppable? FireChat messaging app unites China and Taiwan in free speech… and it’s not pretty » revient longuement sur l’utilisation de ce service durant les manifestations à Taïwan et sur l’adoption de ce service de messagerie « prototype » qui ne nécessite pas de connexion à Internet pour fonctionner et s’appuie plutôt sur le nombre d’utilisateurs en présence au moment où des services de messagerie internet centralisé (WhatsApp, Viber, Facebook Messenger, etc.) ne fonctionnent plus étant donné la saturation du réseau téléphonique. Rien de véritablement nouveau de ce coté là, les applications ou logiciels « MESH » (réseaux maillés, peer-to-peer en mobilité) ont déjà fait parlé d’elles ces dernières années (voir également le projet Qaul.net de Christoph Wachter et Mathias Jud – duo de net-artistes suisses basés à Berlin) Les mouvements Occupy et les printemps arabes de ces dernières années ont d’ailleurs cristallisé à un moment donné les enjeux de ces services pensés sur des architectures informatiques distribuées et mobiles. C’est notamment le cas de Commotion[9], qui promettait en 2011, un internet « embarquable » dans une valise pour lutter contre les censures des régimes autoritaires arabes ou birmans[10]. Mais de manière assez étrange, peu d’applications grands publics avaient vu le jour à ce moment là et le déploiement de ce type de logiciels-applications était plutôt réservé à une élite composée de développeurs – bidouilleurs de réseaux (reste que les déploiements de réseaux MESH via le logiciel Commotion sont tout à fait intéressants dans les villes en crises aux Etats Unis, sur ce point, voir ici). Le mouvement Occupy de New York avait bien vu son lot d’application en tout genre pour voter ou bien signaler son approbation aux votes d’assemblées directe (voir notamment le Inhuman Microphone et le People’s Skype de Jonathan Baldwin) mais un tel phénomène d’adoption d’une technologie n’avait jamais eu lieu jusqu’à la semaine dernière dans les rangs des manifestants de Taïwan (reste, bien entendu, que la composante numérique a bien entendu joué un rôle très important dans les soulèvements des pays arabes en 2011-2012, mais c’est ici un autre sujet)…

 firechat-650x365

Firechat

De Taïwan à la Chine…

En 11 jours, FireChat semble avoir dépassé l’autre service de messagerie instantanée Line (17 millions d’utilisateurs à Taïwan pour une population de 23 millions d’habitants) dans le top des applis les plus téléchargées sur l’île de Formose. L’explication de ce taux de pénétration exceptionnel est plutôt simple : FireChat n’a rien d’extraordinaire si ce n’est d’offrir un service fonctionnel de mise en communication directe entre appareils (nearby mode) et donc la possibilité de créer des réseaux maillés de petites tailles (réseaux bluetooth multi utilisateurs élargi et à plus grande échelle, 30 mètres maximum. À Taïwan, ils servent aux manifestants à communiquer au milieu de la foule, à indiquer leurs positions, les déplacements et directions à suivre lors de défilés). On comprend ce genre d’intérêt lorsque l’on s’est retrouvé une ou plusieurs fois au sein d’événement où notre réseau téléphonique ne passe plus et où on ne peut plus joindre nos amis présents dans une foule compacte, ou bien lorsque le réseau est inexistant mais que se servir de nos terminaux de communication comme de talkies walkies nous aiderait bien…

TechOrangeScreenie
photo extraite de « Unblockable? Unstoppable? FireChat messaging app unites China and Taiwan in free speech… and it’s not pretty » – 31 mars 2014 – www.techinasia.com [op.cit]

C’est d’ailleurs ici l’ambition première de FireChat, explorer les usages du nearby mode qui devait servir aux festivaliers du Coachella (similaire aux utilisations de Twitter lors du soulèvement égyptien de 2011 par exemple, voir, notamment, les travaux de Paolo Gerbaudo à ce sujet, mais ici, on utilise un service décentralisé qui permet de créer un réseau ad-hoc ne nécessitant aucune connexion à internet), mais l’interface qu’il propose depuis le 23 mars 2014 aux utilisateurs asiatiques a aussi un mode « plus global – everybody mode ».

Sans mettre en relation les personnes en présence, ce mode « everybody » regroupe arbitrairement des groupes de 80 utilisateurs se trouvant dans une région définie tout aussi arbitrairement par les codeurs d’Open Garden. Étant une appli « proof of concept », c’est à dire, pas vraiment finalisée mais lancée sur le marché pour voir de quelle manière les utilisateurs s’emparent de ses fonctionnalités, les développeurs de FireChat, ne se sont pas attardés trop longtemps à définir des zones géographiques précises des groupes de conversations « globales » (par exemple, outre-Atlantique, les Etats Unis et le Canada forment une seule zone de tchat sur le mode « everyone »). Il leur semblait normal de regrouper au sein d’une même zone les Taïwanais, les Chinois et les habitants de Hong Kong. Sauf que discuter entre taïwanais et chinois n’était plus quelque chose à l’ordre du jour depuis un certain temps et qu’aucune appli ou réseau social ne permettait de créer un grand « forum » de débat autour des points de vue politiques des citoyens lambda de Chine et de Taïwan.

http://cdn.techinasia.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/FireChatPNG-720x637.png
photo extraite de « Unblockable? Unstoppable? FireChat messaging app unites China and Taiwan in free speech… and it’s not pretty » – 31 mars 2014 – www.techinasia.com [op.cit]

Les résultats ne sont pas « jolis-jolis » comme le déclare le journaliste Josh Horwitz, on retrouve surtout énormément de trollage et de bashing entre les deux vieux ennemis chinois discutant de politique transfrontalière mais si l’on jette un autre point de vue sur ces évènements, en les observant notamment au travers des travaux récents d’Antonio Casilli, on peut porter un nouveau regard sur un dialogue qui aurait été rompu entre ces deux populations et qui grâce à ces mobilisations politique trouverait un nouvel espace de recomposition. Pour l’instant cet espace n’est pas fermé ; comme le montre la photo précédente, en mode « everyone », on débat sur des thèmes particuliers comme celui de la définition de « liberté ». Les insultes doivent fuser et les trolls doivent s’en donner à cœur joie… Mais face au blocage de Sina Weibo (le Twitter-Facebook chinois) et de WeChat (appli de messagerie instantanée la plus populaire de Chine) des contenus déviants de la ligne officielle du parti chinois, FireChat apparaît comme un espace de débat inédit ou pourrait se recomposer un dialogue démocratique.

Il faudra donc que les manifestants des deux bords soient capables de dépasser le trollage et les simples indications de géolocalisation durant les manifestations (« je suis à tel croisement, ici c’est calme la manifestation ») pour composer un espace de dialogue, d’argumentation et de débat public (ce qui est certainement en cours si l’on pouvait « déplier » l’ensemble des conversations « everybody mode » de FireChat). Les autorités pourront aussi très rapidement bloquer cette appli et la possibilité de parler entre Taïwanais et Chinois (fermer les « robinets de l’internet » comme Moubarak le faisait si bien en Egypte lorsque des utilisateurs du web prenaient trop la parole, ou bien encore couper des services tels que ceux de Blackberry lors d’émeutes décision des autorités britanniques en 2011, deux techniques finalement peu efficaces).

N’empêche que, en tant que Proof of concept application, son statut actuel selon Christophe Daligault, responsable communication d’Open Garden et de FireChat, cette appli vient de montrer que des contextes d’usages très politiques rendaient plus que pertinents certains types de technologies de communication. Et il est intéressant de constater, à nouveau, que les formes d’architectures des services de communication que nous utilisons ont voir avec le type de contexte d’adoption de ces technologies[11] et le type de débat public qui s’en suit. N’est ce pas après les émeutes de Seattle que s’est formé le réseau IndyMedia pour couvrir autrement les contre-manifestations de 1999, lors de la réunion de l’OMC et du FMI? N’est ce pas dans des villes en crise comme Détroit, Philadelphie ou Athènes que se développent des infrastructures de communication participatives et distribuées ?

Les analyses de Susan Benesh et de Diana Mutz, tout comme celles d’Antonio Casilli montrent désormais qu’il faut prêter plus attention aux environnements des prises de paroles en ligne afin de comprendre des phénomènes socio-politiques contemporains. Ce qui se joue à Taïwan en ce moment au travers l’arène de discussion FireChat est fascinant : des formes de discours traversent des communautés autrefois fermées sur elles-mêmes grâce à des infrastructures de communication tout à fait particulières. Une forme de parole libre est en train d’échapper à des modes de contrôle et de censure « descendants », des internautes ont exploité une application prototype pour construire une arène de débat. En 2009, Casilli évoquait déjà l’usage des TIC lors de mouvements de protestation en Corée du Sud en présentant le mouvement des bougies (chotbul en coréen) qui avait paralysé la capitale coréenne de mai à août 2009 pour protester contre un accord commercial entre les Etats Unis et leur pays.

À l’heure où l’Europe est en pleine négociation avec les Etats-Unis sur le marché transatlantique, pourrait-on s’attendre (ou pas) à de telles mobilisations en Europe? Les « cultures numériques » des jeunes générations européennes pourraient elles êtres en mesure de s’organiser de cette manière ? Avec quels types d’outils et dans quelles langues ? L’exemple Taïwanais de l’utilisation de messagerie instantanée pose beaucoup de questions.

Et si l’avenir du débat public était assuré par les citoyens eux mêmes qui constitueraient eux mêmes l’infrastructure de communication décentralisée de cette démocratie participative ?

Affaire à suivre…


[1] Sur ce point, voir : http://www.lemonde.fr/asie-pacifique/article/2014/03/30/manifestation-massive-a-taiwan-contre-un-pacte-commercial-avec-la-chine_4392194_3216.html

[2] Fonction du système d’exploitation des téléphones Apple qui permet de créer un réseau ad hoc entre appareils. Ce protocole permet d’établir un réseau maillé (ou « mesh ») en utilisant des connexions directes entre appareils (via ondes WiFi ou Bluetooth), pour créer une sorte de réseau local dont la taille dépend du nombre des appareils ainsi interconnectés. Cette fonctionnalité des terminaux Mobiles Apple était jusqu’ici très peu utilisée et permettait simplement de faire bénéficier d’une connexion internet à un autre terminal en « partage de connexion ». FireChat utilise ce framework pour créer un service, une application à part entière de messagerie instantannée fonctionnant sans internet, en pair à pair, d’appareils à appareils.

[3] Gerbaudo, P. (2012), Tweets and the Streets Social Media and Contemporary Activism, Pluto Press, Londres.

[4] On retient désormais très bien les leçons de Gene Sharp quand au fait de nommer avec une couleur ou une fleur des mouvements de résistance et/ou des soulèvements citoyens non-violents : révolution orange en Ukraine, des roses en Géorgie, des Tulipes au Kirghizstan, révolution du Jasmin en Tunisie, du Cèdre au Liban révolution verte en Iran, etc…

[7] Dominique Cardon dans la préface française de Turner, F. (2012), Aux Sources de l’utopie numérique, De la contre-culture à la cyberculture: Steward Brand, un homme d’influence, C&F éditions, Caen.

[9] Sur ce point, voir: https://commotionwireless.net/

[11] Sur ce point, rappelons qu’en 2008-2009, Mobiluck, un service de messagerie instantanée via bluetooth faisait un véritable carton dans les galeries commerçantes Saoudiennes et apparaissait comme l’application la plus appropriée pour « draguer en présence », sans intermédiaires et sans abonnement à un réseau téléphonique.

François Huguet

PhD student in Communication Studies at the Codesign Lab & Media Studies at Telecom ParisTech. Supervisor: Annie Gentès / Co-supervisor: Jérôme Denis

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterDelicious